Why This Economic Crisis Differs From the Last One for Women

Unlike the financial crash of 2008, this downturn will likely lead to more job losses for women, according to new research.

“The Covid-19 pandemic will have a disproportionate negative effect on women.”

— A new study by researchers at Northwestern University, the University of Mannheim in Germany and the University of California, San Diego.


Today is Equal Pay Day, which represents just how much further into the calendar year American women would have to work to earn what their male counterparts made last year.

Women in the United States who work full time, year-round, earn on average 82 cents for every dollar that a man earns, according to Census Bureau data analyzed by the American Association of University Women. Women of color fare far worse: Black women earn 62 cents on the dollar and Hispanic women 54 cents.



This year, as a pandemic cripples the economy, these inequities will come into sharp focus, as many women confront the coronavirus on the front lines or lose their jobs because of the economic downturn.


The crisis may also make the inequities worse — at least in the short term, according to a new paper examining the impact of the virus on the economy by researchers at Northwestern University, the University of Mannheim in Germany and the University of California, San Diego.


“The Covid-19 pandemic will have a disproportionate negative effect on women and their employment opportunities,” the authors write.


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